Many of the "Door's" found in Maine and New Hampshire may very well be descended from Richard Door of Portsmouth, NH. Before the early 1800's it was commonly spelled Door in the early sources - sometime after 1800 more common spelling changed to Dore, Doar, Dorr, or Doore; few families in the Maine/New Hampshire area kept Door.

My own GGG grandfather Joel Door was married (to Hannah Hussey) in Shapleigh, ME in 1800 as Door, moved north to Harmony, ME where the town record used Doore for all the related families until after 1820 when they changed to Dore (with a change of the town clerk shown by a change of handwriting). 

GGG grandfather Joel moved away to Dover-Foxcroft from Harmony in 1811, and kept Doore, however some of his children changed to Dorr in the mid 1800's.  The early handritten records of Piscataquis County use Door, Dore, Doore, Doar, and Dorr in records of our family, sometimes more than one spelling on the same page.
So there we are; Door, Doore, Dore, and Dorr - all cousins.

Views: 998

Comment by Timothy Lunney on May 1, 2011 at 10:16am

RICHARD DORE was born about 1645 in England. He emigrated from England to Portsmouth, New Hampshire before 1669. In 1669, his residence was recorded as Sagamore Creek at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He was a tailor by trade, and a heavy drinker and brawler as a young man, but appears to have settled down after he became a father.

 
Richard Dore was listed on a subscription list in 1671 for support of the minister: "ffree Subscriptions towards mr Moodys Mayntenance for ye yeare 1671, began to be taken the 17th of March at the Meeting house." In July, 1671, he was called before the Court: “At a court of adjournmt the 1 of July 1671: It appearing to this Court that Richard Dore hath sworne sevl oathes before he went out of the place where he was. The Court sentence him to pay 10s & he to Continew bound to ye premises unto ye next Court of associates & then to appeare.”


In 1672, Richard Dore married Thomsyn “Tamsen” Jackson, the daughter of John Jackson and Joan (Lurfette) Jackson, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Tamsen Jackson's father was a prominent shipbuilder and one of the wealthiest men in Portsmouth. His large home, built in 1664, is the oldest surviving wood frame house in New Hampshire.


In June 1672, Dore was in the Court again on a charge of excessive drinking: “Wee the Grand Jurey for the Countie of Dover & Portsmouth doe present the ensueing to the Honoured Countie Court now sitting at Portsmouth 25 June 1672. Item Wee present Ric: Dore of Portsmouth for Excessive drincking owned Witnesses Wm Cotton, Ric: Rowe sentence 3s(?) 4d(?).m24.” Then in June 1673, he was back in Court for drinking and fighting: “June 1673 The Grand Jurie for the Countie of Dover & Porstmouth doe present to the Countie Court now sitting. Wee p'nt Ric Dore & Tho: Carter Taylours of Strawburey banck for being in drinck & fighting ye last Traineing day at Strawburey banck at Jno Pickerings house. Dore owned Wittnesses Mary Pickering Mary Parker. Rich Dore for being in drink & fighting the Last trayning day he owned the prsntmt. senteenc to pay 6s 8d fine.”


Richard Dore and Tamsen (Jackson) Dore had six children:

  1. Mary Dore, born about 1673 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
  2. Joanna Dore, born about 1675 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and married (1) John Bourne, (2) David Cane and (3) Stephen Knowles.
  3. Bryan Dore, born about 1680 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and married Martha Jackson.
  4. Philip Dore, born about 1682 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and died in 1761 at Lebanon, Maine.
  5. John Dore, born about 1684 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and married Mary Wiggin.
  6. Solomon Dore born about 1687 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Richard Dore appeared on the tax list for Strawberry Bank at Portsmouth, New Hampshire on September 4, 1684. In a list of "Allotment of Seats, In The Meeting-House, Portsmouth, N.H. 1693", Richard Dore is listed as sitting "In ye Mens Gallerys fronting ye Pulpet viz." in row 3. Tamsen, his wife, is listed as "Women Seated below Staires as followeth, viz. ... Goody Dore" in row 7. “Goody”, an abbreviation of “goodwife”, was a courtesy title of married women, formerly used where “Mrs.” would be used today.

In 1695, Richard Dore was enlisted for militia service: "To the Right honourable Nathaniel Fryer Esq. President...honoured Sir- In pursuance of a preseptt to me directed By the Lt. Governor Bearing date the 11th of November 1695, I have from time to time posted those men detached for his Majts service & sent to me...followth viz....Richard Doore at Will. Dames, from the 6th to the 9th, on which day he was dismissed and Willobe Nason and Jno. Bly posted there...Jno. Tuttle, Capt. Feb. the 24th 1695-6." He also served at Dover, New Hampshire in 1696 during King William’s War.

Richard Dore died before 1716 at about age 71 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. His will was dated February 16, 1715: “gives all to (his wife) and aft. her to my children every one alike.”

Comment by James H. Doore on May 1, 2011 at 5:56pm
Thanks for the history of Richard Door - very well composed.

Just after Richard and Tamson married it is said that her father gave them a workshop near his home, I believe that they may have lived there before moving to Sagamore Creek.  On visiting the Jackson House in Portsmouth one can see that there is notch in the layout of the lot where now stands a cottage, I believe this may well be the site of Richard and Tamson's first family home.

Early records call Richard a tailor, but after his death Tamson refers to him as a fisherman.  It seems likely that a move to Sagamore Creek may have signaled a change of occupation from urban tailor to a rural subsistance farmer / fisherman.

Searching English records for traces of the Door origins, I have come across records of Doors in the Isle of Wight (IOW) that include an inordinate number with the given name Richard.  Many of the IOW Doors are listed as tailors.  I have not found a Philip on the IOW, but there was a prominent Philip Door, mayor of Lymington (the closest ferry connection to the IOW) - surely, If he came from IOW, our Richard would have known of Philip of Lymington.   This may account for the naming of Richard and Tamson's son Philip.

Perhaps a DNA study might locate an English origin of the family name.
Comment by Kevin McKinney on November 10, 2011 at 5:43pm

Interested in any more info on David Cane and Johanna Dore .......believe he was her first husband not second....also they had a child???

 Thank You

Comment by James H. Doore on November 10, 2011 at 7:42pm

I indeed have David Cane (c1666-1695) as Johanna Dore's (c1671>1717) first husband, married 1691 in Portsmouth, NH.  I have not done any original research on her.

I also would be most interested to know more about her, particularly any children.

I have five children by John Bourne (c1666<1717): Benjamin, William, Elizabeth, Mary, and John.

Also one child by Stephen Knowles (c1666>1727): Samuel.

 

Comment by Kevin McKinney on November 12, 2011 at 3:32pm

James

 I believe some or at least one of her children were from David Cane....they were involved in a fornication charge for the state of NH in march 1692 "google it".......I will try and get back to Portsmouth Athenaeum this week and see about the 5 children she brought into the South church 1715....I live in York harbor

 my email kmckinne@maine.rr.com  let me know you got this thanks

Comment by Kris on June 27, 2012 at 5:38pm

Please document where the above information was aquired. There is some confusion on Ancestry.com between Richard Door and a John Door. Are they one and the same?

Comment by James H. Doore on June 28, 2012 at 2:19am

Have you got a little more detail about the Richard and John you are interested in?

Maybe some dates, locations, or relationships...

Comment by Kris on June 28, 2012 at 1:53pm

I'm sorry, I miss wrote. . .my confusion is about Richard Dore's connection to the Jackson's (Richard and John). Information on the Jackson House in Portsmouth states that it was built by Richard Jackson, not John Jackson. The  above comments seem to indicate that it was built by John Jackson and that John Jackson's daughter was Tamsen who married Richard Dore, rather than Tamsen being the daughter of Richard Jackson. This is how the link appears on Ancestry.com also. I would like to know the documentation for Mr. Lunney's narrative history.

Comment by Donna Goodwin on June 28, 2012 at 2:12pm

James, could you please let me know if you have any information on a Thomas J Dorr born abt 1854 in Garland . son of True W Dore.  His wife was Dora Parker.  Do you know if he was ever married to a Dora Willey Crocker.

Comment by Timothy Lunney on July 3, 2012 at 9:52am

Here's what I have for Thomsyn "Tamsen" (Jackson) Dore and her father John Jackson (All of which was compiled from various internet sources; so I can't attest to its accuracy):

THOMSYN “TAMSEN” JACKSON, the daughter of John Jackson and his second wife Joan (Lurfette) Jackson, was born in 1643 and baptized on June 11, 1643 at Dartmouth, St. Saviour, England. Tamsen Jackson immigrated to Portsmouth, New Hampshire before 1672. She married Richard Dore in 1672 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Richard Dore and Tamsen (Jackson) Dore had six children:

  1. Mary Dore, born about 1673 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
  2. Joanna Dore, born about 1675 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and married (1) John Bourne, (2) David Cane and (3) Stephen Knowles. On December 9, 1692, Joanna was convicted of “fornication” with David Cane.
  3. Bryan Dore, born about 1680 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and married Martha Jackson.
  4. Philip Dore, born about 1682 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and died in 1761 at Lebanon, Maine.
  5. John Dore, born about 1684 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and married Mary Wiggin.
  6. Solomon Dore born about 1687 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Richard Dore died before 1716 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. His will was dated February 16, 1715: “gives all to (his wife) and aft. her to my children every one alike.” After Richard died, man named Samuel Manson became Tamsen Jackson's “bondsman”.

Tamsen (Jackson) Dore died after 1715.

 

JOHN JACKSON was born around 1600 at the seaside town of Paignton, Devonshire, England. He married first to Elinor Milcome on August 10, 1629 at Dartmouth, Devonshire, England.  He married second to Joan Lurfette on March 30, 1633 at Dartmouth. They had four children at Dartmouth before immigrating to America. John Jackson, his wife Joan and children emigrated from Dartmouth, England, about 1645. They settled at Portsmouth, New Hampshire before 1650, as the town records show they were resident there in that year.  In 1656, John Jackson was one of the Townsmen, or Selectmen of Portsmouth. He was the owner of Noble's Island from 1656 to 1660, when he deeded the island to his son Thomas on June 25, 1660. The Jackson’s were ship builders, and were among the wealthiest families in 17th century Portsmouth.

John and Joan Lurfette Jackson had at least four children:

  1. John Jackson Jr., born in 1635 in England and died in 1722 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
  2. Thomsyn “Tamsen” Jackson, born about 1643 at Dartmouth, Devonshire, England and married Richard Dore in 1672 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
  3. Thomas Jackson.
  4. Richard Jackson.

John Jackson died in 1666 at about age 66 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. An inventory of his estate shows a distribution of property to Richard, the eldest son: "house and land £100." This was probably the house, now known as the “Jackson House," built about 1664.

Comment

You need to be a member of Maine Genealogy Network to add comments!

Join Maine Genealogy Network

© 2019   Created by Chris Dunham.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service