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Comment by Chris Dunham on June 2, 2010 at 3:25am
The 1820 census shows two different Stephen Coffins living in Freeport and Wiscasset. The one who lived in Wiscasset was evidently the son of Rev. Paul Coffin of Buxton.
Comment by Elizabeth Irwin Kane on June 2, 2010 at 8:35am
Thanks, Chris. The html coding appears in my posts to the site. Am I hitting a wrong key or something? As an aside, the town leaders here in Alexandria, VA rowed out to meet the British as they came down the Potomac. The British told them to row back home and they'd deal with them once they finished with Washington. Meanwhile, Madison with troops, treasury, and cabinet, fled to Brookeville, MD where the town leaders refused him refuge because, they said, he was a "War President" and they were Quakers. A friend of Dolley's convinced her husband to let Madison et al to spend the night. My sister now lives in the house, which is called Madison House. Brookeville has the distinction of being Seat of the US Govt. for a day. I suspect the Mainers from Wiscasset performed better than the Virginians from Alexandria.
Comment by Chris Dunham on June 2, 2010 at 1:05pm
I'm not sure what's happening with your posts. When you click the HTML tab can you see and remove the coding?
Comment by Elizabeth Irwin Kane on June 2, 2010 at 4:03pm
The coding appears whether or not I have Rich Text on or HTML. Also usgennet.org thinks Alna is Alma. Now I don't feel so dumb.
Comment by Elizabeth Irwin Kane on June 2, 2010 at 4:14pm
Can you recommend a good history of the War of 1812 as fought in Maine or on the New England Coast? I have Hickey's "the War of 1812," Borneman's "The War that forged a Nation," Marrin's "The War Nobody Won," and Lord's "The Dawn's Early Light." What I have, however, seems to be focused on this area, although Hickey has some good information.
Comment by Chris Dunham on June 2, 2010 at 9:31pm
I see that many other people have had problems with this same additional coding on other sites. It apparently happens most often when content is copied and pasted from another program, especially for people using the Safari or Chrome browsers. If viewing in HTML mode and deleting the extra code doesn't fix it, I don't know what else to suggest.

I don't know of a good history of the War of 1812 in Maine or New England, though I've read good accounts of local skirmishes in some of the old town histories.
Comment by Elizabeth Irwin Kane on June 3, 2010 at 10:39am
I'll switch to Firefox.

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